web analytics

url

Patients who need medical marijuana are moving from Wisconsin to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to gain safe access
[Miklian Antiquarian Maps]

Medical marijuana patients who in states where cannabis is still illegal for any purpose — but who decide to move to a state next door which allows MMJ — are the subjects of a new study in Wisconsin. This study will look specifically at patients who have moved from Wisconsin to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan which is immediately adjacent.

406329_449039305126674_98619648_n

Jay Selthofner:
“Over the past year, I have helped people relocate, patients and caregivers”

Participants are needed for the undergraduate research study, being conducted by a student/staff team specializing in geography at the University of Wisconsin Fox Valley, according to activist Jay Selthhofner.

Jay told us he became involved with the study after he was approached by Andrew Shears, a professor at the University who follows his cannabis activism. The professor and a student had the idea after seeing Selthofner’s recent work helping medical marijuana refugees move from Wisconsin to Michigan. ”Over the past year, I have helped people relocate, patients and caregivers,” Selthofner told Toke Signals.

“After using marijuana production and distribution as an example of a black market economic geography in class, one student, Jonathan Steffen, approached me about examining that specific topic in more depth,” Dr. Shears writes on his website. “To do so, Jonathan and I are collaborating on this project for a spring independent study.”

“We are looking for people who actually completed the migration and moved from Wisconsin to Michigan,” Jay said.

url-1

Dr. Andrew Shears, University of Wisconsin Fox Valley:
“After using marijuana production and distribution as an example of a black market economic geography in class, one student, Jonathan Steffen, approached me about examining that specific topic in more depth”

“Jonathan, the student, is hoping to create both an academic work and a political tool with this research,” Selthofner told us. “He hopes to create a paper that is suitable for peer-reviewed publication. He also intends to present the paper as a poster during the ‘Posters in the Rotunda’ event at the state capitol this spring so that his results will be seen by relevant lawmakers.

“We hope to show the multitude of reasons and some of the economic impact felt on both sides — from the drain here in Wisconsin to the positive impact in Michigan,” Selthofner told us.

“We will be looking to conduct our research in the form of a single, semi-structured interview with medical marijuana patients and caregivers, mainly those who migrated internally for political-medicinal relief,” Selthofner said.

“By studying the migration of medical marijuana patients to Michigan, we hope to contribute our results to the discussion on marijuana law reform, as well as the geography of health related circumstances in general,” Selthofner said. “Participation in the study will provide researchers with the information necessary to examine the factors leading to interstate medical migration for access to marijuana, as well as the various cultural, social and economic impacts resulting from the choice to relocate.”

Participants in the study will never be identified, according to Selthofner, except through the use of a participant identification number, and all participants will remain anonymous forever.

“Benefits for participants include personal reflection and scientific contribution, and indirectly it could allow the patients to move back into Wisconsin if the research convinces legislators to move forward on policy formation regarding the medicinal uses of marijuana,” Selthofner said.

Those interested in participating in the study can contact Selthofner at 920.410.2920 or email jay@selthofnerconsulting.com.