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STEVE ELLIOTT

Your source for uncut, uncensored, no holds barred, non-corporate controlled cannabis news

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Find out what you need to know about the week in cannabis/marijuana news, in just 26 minutes!

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Toke TV Bud Pick of the Week

Strain: ASAP (AC/DC x El Salvador) THC:CBD 1:1 Grower: Slappy at Secret Seeds in Seattle
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Strain: ASAP (AC/DC x El Salvador)
THC:CBD 1:1
Grower: Slappy at Secret Seeds in Seattle

Toke TV Stories of the Week

Three-Year Scientific Study: Working Memory Unaffected In Heavy Marijuana Users

(Toke Signals)

A three-year study of heavy cannabis users and controls suggests that “sustained moderate to heavy levels of cannabis” use do not affect working memory.

The longitudinal neuro-imaging study, published in the March 2014 issue of Addiction Biologywas investigating the relationship between substance use (alcohol, cannabis, nicotine, and illegal psychotropic drugs) and working-memory network function over time in heavy cannabis users, and in controls.

Forty-nine participants performed an n-back working-memory task at baseline, and at a three-year follow-up. At follow-up, there were 22 current heavy marijuana users, four abstinent heavy users and 23 non-cannabis-using controls. Tensor-independent component analysis (Tensor-ICA) was used to look at individual differences in working-memory network functionality over time.

Within the group of marijuana users, “cannabis-related problems” remained stable, whereas alcohol-related problems, nicotine dependence and illegal psychotropic drug use all increased over time.

At both measurements, both the initial measurement and the three-year follow-up, behavioral performance and network functionality during the n-back task did not differ between heavy users and controls.

 

Arizona State Senator Blocks Federally Approved Medical Marijuana PTSD Study

(Hemp News)

The much-talked-about proposed federally approved study about using marijuana to treat military veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) made headlines when it got a green light from the federal FDA and the Department of Health and Human Services. It even passed the Arizona House of Representatives (the study would be done at the University of Arizona). But one Arizona State Senator, Kimberly Yee, a Republican from Phoenix, has stopped the study in its tracks.

The study, which organizers say is aimed at veterans suffering from PTSD who have not been helped by other treatments, would not be funded with state tax money, but rather through the sale of medical marijuana cards, reports Steve Krafft at Fox 10 News.

Senator Yee, who chairs the Senate Education Committee, the recipient of the bill, had a hearing scheduled for 9 a.m. on Thursday, but Yee said she would not let them consider the study.

Contact Sen. Kimberly Yee on Twitter @kimberlyyeeaz and call her at 602.926.3024 and ask her why she blocked the PTSD study for veterans.

 

Nevada: Clark County Commission Allows Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

(Hemp News)

Commissioners in Clark County, Nevada gave a victory to advocates on Wednesday, approving an ordinance to allow medical marijuana dispensaries.

The 4-2 vote is a long-sought milestone for medicinal cannabis proponents, who have long pushed for dispensaries so that patients could have safe access to marijuana, reports Ben Botkin at the Las Vegas Review-Journal. The new change also allows marijuana cultivation and testing in the county.

Before approving the proposal, commissioners tweaked it, eliminating the proposed restriction requiring a 330-foot separation from residential properties. Special permit applications will now give commissioners broader discretion to grant permits if they deem them suitable for the surrounding area.

 

Oregon: New Medical Marijuana Rules Require Child-Proof Packaging, Outlaw Most Infused Sweets

(Hemp News)

The Oregon Health Authority on Wednesday issued draft rules to keep marijuana-infused foods and candies away from children.

The rules result from the passage of Senate Bill 1531, a measure which allows municipalities to ban medical marijuana dispensaries, which were finally legalized last year after years of existing in a gray area of the law.

The rules are controversial and opposed by many medicinal cannabis patients and advocates, since they ban many sweet marijuana-infused medibles popular with patients, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian.

Dispensaries may not sell marijuana-infused products “manufactured in a form that resembles cake-like products, cookies, candy, or gum, or that otherwise may be attractive to minors because of its shape, color, or taste,” the oddly written draft rules state.

 

Michigan: Medical Marijuana Regulatory Agency Approves Adding PTSD As Qualifying Condition

(Hemp News)

The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs has decided to accept the recommendation of the Michigan Medical Marihuana Review Panel and add post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of qualifying conditions for the state medical marijuana program.

This is the first time a qualifying condition has been added in Michigan. Residents in Michigan suffering from PTSD will now be allowed to treat their symptoms with medical marijuana if their doctors recommend it, starting immediately. The statement from the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs can be read by clicking here.

“Individuals who are exposed to traumatic events can suffer from PTSD, including veterans and victims of domestic violence,” said Chris Lindsey, legislative analyst for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP). “It can lead to severe depression, anxiety, insomnia, nightmares, flashbacks, anger, or other symptoms.”

 

There’s Nothing Else Like It: NW Cannabis Market In Seattle

(Toke Signals)

There are several medical cannabis farmers markets in the Puget Sound area, but I’d never been to one quite like NW Cannabis Market’s Galaxy location on Rainier Avenue in Seattle until a memorable visit on Wednesday.

Juan shows off one of his Kushes at the 3C booth at Galaxy, on Rainier Avenue in Seattle
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Juan shows off one of his Kushes at the 3C booth at Galaxy, on Rainier Avenue in Seattle

One of NW Cannabis’ two locations (the other one is at White Center, is an also an excellent access point with plenty of great deals and wonderful vendors), Galaxy is a wonderland of cannabis treats.

One thing that distinguishes the two NW Cannabis is that while most such markets are only open on weekends, Galaxy (telephone 206.420.4065) is open 7 days a week (11 a.m. to 7 p.m.), and the White Center location (206.420.4823) keeps the same hours five days a week, Tuesday through Saturday.

It feels almost like a marijuana mini-mall, complete with a dab bar where you can relax, take a load off your feet, enjoy a cold water, soda, or juice, and choose from a tasty menu of butane-extracted hash oils including some spectacular Alaskan ThunderFuck that rocked my world. (New patients get a free complimentary dab.)

 

Don’t Fall For The B.S. About A Medical Marijuana ‘Crisis’ In Washington State

(Toke Signals)

There’s been a lot of hot air — and precious little illumination — coming from some mighty prominent places when it comes to the failure of the Washington Legislature this session to force medical marijuana “into compliance” with the recreational cannabis system created by the passage of legalization measure Initiative 502.

For instance, I keep hearing nonsense (often from people who should certainly know better) about the “unwillingness of the medical marijuana community to compromise.” We have some people trying to rewrite history, here.

Our current medical marijuana law in Washington state is the result of many, manycompromises the patient community already made in the Legislature, after the people passed the original initiative in 1998.

 

Toke TV Must Read of the Week

State Accidentally Releases Confidental Law Enforcement Info To Marijuana Activist

(Toke Signals)

How Secure Is A Patient Registry, When Washington Can’t Even Keep Law Enforcement Info Confidential?

Several bills introduced in the 2014 session of the Washington Legislature would have effectively killed medical marijuana in the state, but none of them passed. Each of the MMJ-killer bills died when the session ended Thursday night. At one time, it seemed almost a slam dunk that at least one of these execrable pieces of legislation — which would greatly reduce patient plant and possession limits and shut down all dispensaries in the state — would pass.

What happened?

According to inside information obtained by Toke Signals, a clash over taxes wasn’t the only reason the Washington Legislature’s medical marijuana-killer bills died in the session that ended Thursday night.

Another reason the bills — which were supposedly meant to bring medical marijuana “into compliance” with recreational legalization measure I-502, approved by state voters in November 2012, died in the 2014 Legislature — was  a confidentiality breach from the state.

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