Toke Signals Header - Your Source for Uncut, Uncensored, Non-Corporate Controlled Cannabis News toke signals logo - two crossed smoking joints with a cannabis leaf above

with

STEVE ELLIOTT

Your source for uncut, uncensored, no holds barred, non-corporate controlled cannabis news

The Washington State Liquor Control Board, along with the Washington State Department of Agriculture, on Friday announced that more than 200 pesticides will be allowed for use in the production, processing and handling of marijuana sold through state-licensed stores.

If you were expecting pesticide-free pot from the state stores, so much for that idea… and don’t even think about asking for “organic” cannabis, as there certainly won’t be any of that.

Is it a coincidence that the WSLCB waited until the day after their “public input” meeting to announce that state-store marijuana will have all these pesticides in it? One can only imagine what the patients who spoke Thursday night would have had to say about that. Many of them have compromised immune systems, compromised liver function, or both — which makes it a really bad idea to ingest bug poison.

By the way, you’re not going to be allowed to grow your own, pesticide-free marijuana, because under I-502, no private home growing is allowed. And as the WSLCB told us again at Thursday night’s meeting, they’re recommending that the right to grow — which Washington patients have had for 15 years now — be taken away, as well. You see, it’s “inefficient,” they say, to have more than one place — you guessed it, THEM! — to buy your cannabis.

Never mind that plenty of patients won’t be able to afford state-store prices. Never mind that plenty of them don’t need to be ingesting pesticides. It’s time to make some phat pot profits, people!

With 25 percent taxes applied to cannabis at the growing, processing, and retail levels (yes, 75 percent tax), that marijuana, which could legally have had more than 200 pesticides used on it, will cost you pretty dearly. Estimates have run as low as $15 and as high as $50 a gram.

List of Acceptable Pesticides for Growing Marijuana under I-502

The rules governing the implementation of I-502 limit pesticides that may be used to produce recreational marijuana. The Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) and the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) recently produced the list of acceptable pesticide products.
Only authorized pesticide products may be used. Using an unauthorized pesticide is a public safety license violation and can result in the cancellation of a producer’s license (see WAC 314-55-520).
WAC 314-55-010(13) defines a pesticide as meaning, but is not limited to: (a) Any substance or mixture of substances intended to prevent, destroy, control, repel, or mitigate any insect, rodent, snail, slug, fungus, weed, and any other form of plant or animal life or virus, except virus on or in a living person or other animal which is normally considered to be a pest; (b) any substance or mixture of substances intended to be used as a plant regulator, defoliant, or desiccant; and (c) any spray adjuvant. Pesticides include substances commonly referred to as herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides.
Licensed producers can use pesticides registered by WSDA under chapter 15.58 RCW that are allowed for use in the production, processing, and handling of marijuana.
If a particular pesticide is not consistent with the allowable pesticide criteria WSDA uses for marijuana production, the applicator could unknowingly be in violation of Washington pesticide laws (RCW 15.58.150(2)(c) and WAC 16-228-1500(1)(b)). We recommend that pesticides from the OMRI list be cross-checked with the list of over 200 pesticides registered by WSDA that are allowable for use in marijuana production in PICOL.
WSU’s Database
A preliminary list of over 200 pesticides registered by WSDA under chapter 15.58 RCW that are allowed for use in the production, processing, and handling of marijuana can be found at Washington State University’s (WSU) PICOL (Pesticide Information Center Online) database at:

Under the “crop” drop-down menu choose: “I-502/I-692 (WA Only).”

PICOL lists the regulatory status of pesticides, as determined by WSDA. Updates can be made on a daily basis as pesticides are registered (and cancelled) by WSDA.

Using the PICOL Database
WSU has prepared tutorials as a starting point for prospective marijuana producer applicants in using the PICOL database.

Contact
If you have any questions, please contact the WSLCB Marijuana Licensing Unit at .

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share This

Share this post with your friends!

toke signals logo - two crossed smoking joints with a cannabis leaf above

Facebook bans me often! Join the Toke Signals emaillist.

Join the email list to be notified when I post new articles.  Since Facebook routinely bans me for little or no reason, this is the best way to stay up to date with Uncut, Uncensored, No Holds Barred, Non Corporate Controlled Cannabis News.

Thanks for subscribing! One more step: Please check your email and click the link to verify your email address.

wordpress statistics
Trafficroots Analysis Pixel